Springtime agility equipment check list

It’s that time of year!  Time to dig out all the agility equipment that you stored for the winter and set it up again. Yeah!  Not! We’d rather get right to the training, wouldn’t we?  Anyway, it’s VERY important that you check your equipment for safety and maintenance issues.   Now is a great time.  Here are a few things to look for…

  1. Inspect everything for sharp edges. Take a rag and slowly rub all edges of your equipment. If the rag snags, sand the area. Be especially concerned about sharp edges on jump cups.
  2. Fill cracks in your wood items. While some cracks are normal and happen to wood over time, it is best to take care of any that are positioned to collect water and cause splitting. Fill with exterior caulk, let dry, and paint with an exterior paint.  Its also best to give another coat of paint to prolong the life of your wood items.
  3. Check for protruding nails on any wood surfaces, including the slats for your a-frame and dog-walk.
  4. Tighten all hardware and check chain links, making sure where the chain attaches to obstacles is secure also.
  5. Treat rust with rust-proofing paint.
  6. Wash your tunnel and chutes with soap and water if needed, and dry thoroughly.  Inspect for any mildew.
  7. Add more colored tape to your tire jump and jumps if they have worn out.  Visit our vinyl tape page at Affordable Agility if you need more.


Tagged with:

2 Comments on “Springtime agility equipment check list

  1. Hi Wonderwoman,

    Good question. Pressure treated lumber just doesn’t work for equipment, actually. The processes (and chemicals) that go into the wood make it VERY heavy with moisture. For a teeter especially, that extra weight will require a dog to have to go to the end of the board before it tips down! Only regular, non-treated planks are suited for what is called the “3-lb, 3-second rule”, which must be followed for competitions.

    Pamela

  2. Helpful list, thanks Pam! I was wondering, this is sort of related to the topic, but I bought your practice teeter base. I put it together and it looks great. I didn’t see anything in your instructions about using pressure-treated planks. Wouldn’t using this make it last longer so I don’t have to periodically paint it?